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Mangano Reminds Residents To Change Batteries In Smoke And Carbon Monoxide Detectors

Nassau County Executive Edward P. Mangano today reminded Nassau County residents to change the batteries in their smoke alarms and carbon monoxide (CO) detectors during Daylight Savings Time which occurs this Sunday, March 11th at 2:00 a.m.

“Residents should always make sure their smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors are working, and the spring and fall time changes are the perfect reminders to test the equipment and change the batteries,” said County Executive Mangano. “Properly working smoke alarms and CO detectors could ultimately be the difference between life and death.”

In addition to changing batteries in smoke and CO alarms this weekend, County Executive Mangano reminded residents to:

  • Test alarms monthly by pressing the test button on the face of the alarm cover.
  • Install a smoke alarm on every level of their home.
  • Replace smoke alarms that are more than 10 years old.
  • Replace CO alarms every 5 years.
  • Plan and practice a home escape in the event of an emergency-designate a safe meeting place outside.

“It is important to raise awareness of the vital role that smoke alarms and CO detectors play in fire safety,” added Mangano. “CO detectors and smoke alarms are basic safety devices that cost very little and using Daylight Saving Time is a great way to remind ourselves to change the batteries in your CO detectors and smoke alarms.”

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) estimates there was a yearly average of 386,300 residential fires resulting in nearly 2,400 deaths between 2006 and 2008. Two-thirds of fire deaths occur in homes where there are no smoke alarms or no working smoke alarms. That is why it is important to replace batteries at least once every year and to test your alarms every month to make sure they work. CPSC recommends consumers have smoke alarms on every level of their home, outside and inside each bedroom.

CPSC estimates there was an annual average of 183 unintentional non-fire CO poisoning deaths associated with consumer products between 2006 and 2008. CO is called the “invisible killer,” because it is a colorless, odorless and poisonous gas. Because of this, people may not know they are being poisoned. Carbon monoxide is produced by the incomplete burning of fuel in various products, including furnaces, portable generators, fireplaces, cars and charcoal grills. That is why it is important to have working CO alarms in the home, on each level and outside each sleeping area.