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Breadcrumb Start you are here >Home/LD16/News Releases/2006

August 16, 2006

Jacobs gathers over 250 signatures urging LIRR officials to ‘Bridge the Gap’

Legislator’s petition drive calls on rail road to close gap, not just video tape those who fall in

Presiding Officer Jacobs points out 15 inch gap.

PHOTO CAPTION:

Presiding Officer Judy Jacobs shows News  55 the 15 ½ inch gap at the Syosset train station.

Nassau County Presiding Officer Judy Jacobs (Woodbury) today collected over 250 signatures from Syosset train station commuters as she launched a petition drive calling on Long Island Railroad officials to bridge the 15-inch gap that exists between the trains and platform at the station, as well as other stations. Last week she called the railroad’s proposed “solution” of video surveillance cameras “unacceptable.”

Last week a teenager died when she slipped into a gap while waiting for a train at another station. The 15-inch gap at the Syosset station is most problematic because of the large curved platform. Following the accident, Long Island Railroad President James Dermody announced that the LIRR would be installing of $1,500,000.00 of surveillance cameras that would allow the viewer to see if, and how, anyone falls into the gap. Jacobs, on the other hand, called for the same protection that exists on many New York stations, where extensions come out from under the platforms to close the gaps on the train. Jacobs said she will continue her petition drive and send the signatures to LIRR President Dermody.

“Anything short of that same type of installation is totally irresponsible and unresponsive to the protection of public safety,” said Jacobs. That is why she will be asking Syosset residents to sign a petition expressing their dissatisfaction with the LIRR’s proposal and to write letters to LIRR President Dermody.

“Surveillance cameras cannot prevent a person from falling through the gaps. Surveillance cameras will not protect a person from being injured, or possibly killed. The LIRR knew about this problem since 1970,” said Jacobs.