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$150 Million Environmental Program Bond Act
In a show of strong bi-partisan support, the Nassau County Legislature in August 2004 and September 2006 unanimously approved the $150 million Environmental Program.  An overwhelming 77% of Nassau County voters agreed, approving the 2004 and 2006 referenda to authorize the issuance of $150 million in bonds to fund the program. The $150 million Environmental Bond Act Program calls for the preservation of 400 acres of open space, improvement of 57 parks, implementation of 42 storm water treatment projects, including installation of nearly 2000 catch basin inserts, and remediation of seven brownfield properties.


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Open Space Acquisitions under the $150 Million Environmental Bond Act Program

Since 2004, Nassau County has preserved over 208 acres of land in Nassau County’s Special Groundwater Protection Area (SGPA) through the $150 Million Nassau County Environmental Bond Act Program.  An additional 30 acres has been preserved in areas outside of the SGPA. The following describes the acquisitions that have been made to date:

 

2004 ENIVORIMENTAL BOND ACT OPEN SPACE ACQUISITIONS

   

Boegner Estate in Old Westbury (Development Right)

The County acquired the development rights to 35 acres, located on Old Westbury Road in Old Westbury known as “Boegner Estate,” for $6.2 million. The title was than acquired by the adjacent property owners Old Westbury Garden and included into the 160-acre Old Westbury Gardens property listed on the National Register of Historic Places; it will be managed by the foundation that runs Old Westbury Gardens.  The Boegner Estate presents a unique opportunity to significantly expand Old Westbury Gardens.

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Boegner Farm in Old Westbury

Boegner Farm is 12.17 acre, acquired for $1,655,000 million. The Property includes several buildings (a multi-family house, three barns and a caretaker cottage), each of which has a Village of Old Westbury landmark designation.  The Property is irregular in shape, includes wooded and landscaped areas, and is encumbered by a 7.44–acre conservation easement, leaving the remaining 4.73 acres unrestricted. In order to avail itself of this opportunity to facilitate the public use and enjoyment of the property, the County entered into a 99-year lease occupancy with Old Westbury Gardens. The lease would require Old Westbury Gardens to maintain and operate the Property for the benefit of all Nassau County residents in a manner consistent with local landmark laws and Old Westbury Gardens’ standards for preservations of this type, and consistent with open space regulations

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Meyer’s Farm in Woodbury (Development Rights)

Located in Woodbury on Woodbury Road by Candor Drive, the Meyer’s Farm is one of the last remaining farms in Nassau County. In 2006, the County acquired development rights for this 8.5-acre property for $4.3 million. The property, irregular in shape, is utilized for farming and fully cultivated, except for the area surrounding the existing dwelling. The property includes a 2,440-square-foot home, a farm stand, several green houses and ancillary buildings.

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Parkway Drive in Baldwin Harbor

The property, made up of 31 contiguous lots comprising 3 acres in Baldwin Harbor along Parkway Drive, was acquired for $4 million. The property fronts Baldwin Bay with additional water along canals on its east and west side. The topography of the site is generally level and is wooded. Comprising three waterfront lots totaling less than an acre, these acquisitions were added to the original Parkway properties in 2006 and add to the parcels previously purchased by the County. The purchase price for these lots was $865,000.

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Pulling Estate in Oyster Bay Cove (Part of the Proposed Red Cote Preserve)

The Pulling Estate, acquired for $6.5 million, is located in Oyster Bay Cove and is approximately 16 acres. The property is rectangular in shape (though slightly irregular) with frontage on Yellow Coat Road and Route 25A. The site, a former farm, is partly wooded and part meadow and has gently rolling topography. Because the property was on the market and in danger of being lost to development, the County acted to make the acquisition.

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Red Spring Woods in Glen Cove

The County acquired 9 acres comprising Red Spring Woods for $4 million. The property is irregular in shape with frontage on Red Spring Lane and additional frontage on Valley Road. The site is entirely wooded with rolling topography and is one of the last remaining undeveloped residential parcels in the area.

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2006 ENIVORIMENTAL BOND ACT OPEN SPACE ACQUISTIONS

Cutting in Oyster Bay Cove (Part of the Proposed Red Cote Preserve)

The property is 7.15 wooded acres and was part of the Cutting Estate, which totals approximately 13.78 acres and is located on Northern Boulevard in the incorporated the Village of Oyster Bay Cove. The property was acquired for $3M and will be merged with the Pulling acquisition done on 2004 and the Schwab acquisition forming the proposed Red Cote Preserve which in approximately 30 acres.

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Gold Property in Seaford

The Property is a vacant lot, nearly one acre in size, with low-line foliage along wetlands covering the Property and was acquired for $635,000. The property fronts a canal which flows to the South Shore Bays and is located directly across the street from Cedar Creek Park.

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Fruggies Farm in East Meadow

The property is approximately 2.5 acres located on the southwest corner of Luddington Road and Merrick Avenue in the unincorporated area of East Meadow and was acquired for $2.1M. The County intends to enter into use and occupancy permits with the operator of the farm. The operator of the Farm will be responsible for the complete management and maintenance of the property.

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Hall Property in Muttontown

The Property is 18.30 acres and was acquired for $8.7M. It is irregular in shape, wooded, and includes gently rolling topography. The site will be consolidated into the adjacent Muttontown Preserve, a 550-acre County-owned property that includes marked trails and open meadows.

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Held Property in Oyster Bay Cove

The 7.98 acres property was acquired for $2.9M and is irregular in shape, wooded, and includes a pond with gently rolling topography. The site abuts Tiffany Preserve, a 200-acre County-owned property that includes marked trails and open meadows.

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Humes Estate in Mill Neck

The Property encompasses approximately 15 acres and is mostly wooded with large variety of specimen trees, natural vegetation and ground cover and was acquired for $5.2M. The property includes a small fresh water pond, several streams and Beaver Creek.  The property is contiguous to the Japanese Stroll Garden and Shu Swamp Preserve. It is a condition of closing that the County shall enter reciprocal easements for shared access and parking between the premises and the Stroll Garden and the Shu Swamp Preserve. The site is situated along Dogwood Lane and along its eastern portion adjacent to Frost Mill Road.

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Old Mill Horse Farm in Brookville/Jericho

This 40-acre property, located in the unincorporated area of Jericho and the incorporated Village of Brookville, was purchased for $12 million. The various lots contained on the property connect through easements to the 550-acre Muttontown Preserve. The County has entered into a license and operating agreement with a company having experience in overseeing this type of horse farm and expects that the licensee will be responsible for managing and maintaining the property, offering educational programming, and providing supervised trail rides to the residents of Nassau County.

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Schwab Property in Oyster Bay Cove (Part of the Proposed Red Cote Preserve)

The property is approximately 5.90 wooded acres and is part of the Schwab Estate, which totals approximately 11.20 acres and is located on Northern Boulevard in the incorporated the Village of Oyster Bay Cove. The property was acquired for $2M and will be merged with the Pulling acquisition done on 2004 and the 2006 acquisition of Cutting forming the proposed Red Cote Preserve which in approximately 30 acres.

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Smithers Estate in Mill Neck

The Property encompasses approximately 25 acres and is partly wooded with meadows. The property also includes a major portion of Upper Francis Pond, which is a natural spring that flows through Shu Swamp Conservancy and joins Beaver Creek which is a federal sanctuary. The site was acquired for $7.8M and includes a barn and cottage house. The site stretches from northeast corner of Oyster Bay Road in Mill Neck to the westside of Beaver Brook Road.

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Trout Lake in West Hempstead

The Property is approximately 2.3 acres and is located between Woodfield Road and Owl Avenue. The Property was acquired for $1.3M consisted of thirteen (13) vacant lots and one lot with a single-family residence. The lots surround Trout Lake, a now-dry lake containing various types of vegetation and Schodack Brook, a stream running from nearby Eagle Avenue through Trout Lake to various culverts below the Southern Parkway, eventually discharging to the South Pond of Hempstead Lake.

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490 North Central Ave in Valley Stream

 

The Property is approximately .71 acres, located on North Central Avenue in Valley Stream. The purchase was aquired for $1,400,000. The Property is a vacant lot on the northwest corner of North Drive and North Central Avenue in the unincorporated area known as Valley Stream. The contract contains a condition that the County shall enter into an Intermunicipal Agreement with the Town of Hempstead providing, among other things, that the Town shall take title to the Property at Closing and shall operate and maintain the Property as a park open to the residents of Nassau County.

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How Projects were Selected for Funding

To assist in the solicitation and evaluation of nominations for funding, an Advisory Committee was appointed by the County Executive comprised of environmental and civic leaders.

2006 Advisory Committee Members

Brian Muellers

Chairman
Adrienne Esposito Executive Director, Citizens Campaign for the Environment
Daniel Donatelli Co-President, Residents for a More Beautiful Port Washington
Cynthia Cooper President, Lakeview 21st Century
Susan Gordon Ryan Vice President, Viscardi Center/National Center for Disabilities
Lisa Ott Executive Director, North Shore Land Alliance
Robert Weltner President, Operation SPLASH
Kyle Rabin Executive Director, Friends of the Bay
Gary Carlton President, Woodmere Park Foundation
Victor Consiglio Member, 12th Assembly District Environmental
Ralph Fumante Chairperson, OSPAC
Neal Lewis Executive Director, Long Island Neighborhood Network
Eric Eichenlaub Representative, Legislative Majority
Daniel McCloy Representative, Legislative Minority
Thomas Maher Nassau County Executive's Office

2004 Advisory Committee Members

Brian Muellers Chairman
Daniel McCloy   Counsel to the Minority Leader of the Legislature
Lisa Ott Executive Director, North Shore Land Alliance
Adrienne Esposito Executive Director, Citizens’ Campaign for the Environment
Cynthia Cooper Lakeview 21st Century
Susan Gordon-Ryan Vice President for Development, National Center for Disabilities
Thomas Maher County Executive’s Office
Katie Schwab County Executive’s Office
Ralph Fumante Nassau County Open Space and Parks Advisory Committee
Neal Lewis Nassau County Planning Commission
Public outreach undertaken to solicit nominations
  • Press release to over 150 media organizations
  • Letters to over 1,000 civic and environmental organizations
  • Letter to 64 Village Mayors, 3 Town Supervisors, the Mayor Glen Cove and City Manager of Long Beach
  • Letters to all Nassau County Legislators
  • Creation of an Environmental Bond Act Website
  • Twelve public meetings
Summary of 2006 Recommendations

2006 Summary Table

2006 Environmental Program Bond Act Advisory Committee Report
Nassau County 2006 Environmental Program Recommended Properties and Projects
Summary of 2004 Recommendations

2004 summary table

pdf 2004 Environmental Program Bond Act Advisory Committee Report
pdf Nassau County 2004 Environmental Program Recommended Properties and Projects
2004 Environmental Bond Act Highlights

Among the open space that has been preserved are Parkway Drive Properties in Baldwin Harbor, Meyers Farm in Woodbury, Twenty-five acres of the Boegner Estate in Old Westbury, 31 acres of the Pulling Estate in Oyster Bay Cove,  Northwood Estate in Oyster Bay Cove, and Red Spring Woods in Glen Cove are also among the parcels already preserved. Preserving open space not only saves these parcels from development, it also protects the groundwater underneath. And county-acquired open space is also available for public use.

Some $5.7 million is earmarked for the 18 parks recommended for improvement. The projects include construction of a new playground and other facilities at Washington Avenue Park in Seaford; a football field at St. Francis Street Park in Roosevelt; and construction of a soccer field and a cricket pitch at the Dutch Broadway Athletic Complex in Elmont.

Many of the 17 storm water improvement projects will help prevent pollutants in storm-water runoff from contaminating Nassau County’s many waterways and wetlands. These projects, which will use about $4.4 million, include water treatment at the Massapequa Preserve, Silver Lake Park in Baldwin, Mill Basin in Merrick and Meadowbrook Creek in Freeport. Wetland plantings and removal of sediment is also recommended for Scudder’s Pond in Sea Cliff.

The seven brownfield clean-up projects, which will use about $1.9 million, include the demolition of an incinerator in Long Beach and the remediation of contaminated properties in Wesbury and Roosevelt.

2006 Environmental Bond Act Highlights

Among the 28 open space properties to be preserved are four farms – Rottkamp’s Farm and Young’s Farm in Old Brookville, Grossman’s Farm in Malverne, and Fruggie’s Farm in East Meadow.  Thirty acres of the Hall Estate in Muttontown and 25 acres of the Frost Mill Manor Estate in Mill Neck are also among the properties slated for preservation. About $77 million will be used for open space preservation.

The county will be working on preserving a total of 319 acres. Preserving open space not only saves these properties from development, it protects groundwater and the county’s drinking water supply. County-acquired open space will be available for public use.

Some $8.4 million is earmarked for 37 parks recommended for improvement. These projects include construction of a playground in Long Beach, restoration of the Old Grist Mill in Roslyn, installation of a multi-purpose playing field in Roosevelt, and creation of a water trail along the south shore, including canoe and kayak launches.

The 25 storm water improvement projects will help prevent pollutants in storm water runoff from contaminating Nassau County’s many waterways and wetlands. These projects, which will use about $10.4 million of bond act funds, include installation of treatment devices in over 1,700 catch basins throughout the county, dredging of Willow Pond in Hewlett and installation of a sediment collection system and wetland plantings in Manorhaven.

The five brownfield projects, which will use $3.8 million in funding, include demolition of the former Glen Cove incinerator, performance of environmental site assessments in Mineola and cleanup of contaminated soil in Baldwin.

 

 

 
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