Breast Cancer and Prostate Health

VIDEO: Prostate Health

Mr. Roger Miller, Health Investigator at the Nassau County Department of Health
Dr. Mason Pimsler, Internist and Geriatric Medicine Doctor at Long Island Family Health Centers
 Dr. Andrea Ault-Brutus, Director of the Office of Health Equity, Nassau County Department of Health

VIDEO: Breast Cancer Awareness

Dr. Carolyn McCummings - Commissioner, Nassau County Department of Human Services
Dr. Larry Norton - Senior Vice President, Office of the President; Medical Director, Evelyn H. Lauder Breast Center; Deputy Director for Clinical and Translational Science, MSK Comprehensive Cancer Center; and Norna S. Sarofim Chair of Clinical Oncology
 Dr. Andrea Ault-Brutus, Director of the Office of Health Equity, Nassau County Department of Health


The Importance of Early Detection and Early Treatment in Communities of Color

 

In honor of National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, which was in September, and Breast Cancer Awareness Month, which was in October, the Nassau County Department of Health Office of Health Equity conducted two videos on these two important topics and its impact on communities of color. In each video, Dr. Andrea Ault-Brutus, the Director of the Office of Health Equity, had a conversation with two residents of Nassau County who discuss their respective journey with prostate illness and breast cancer, alongside medical doctors who provided more information about each of these health conditions and its impact on Black and Brown communities. The good news in both of the stories shared in the videos is that early detection and early treatment were vital to their recovery.

 

The cancer statistics in New York State (NYS) and the United States are startling. According to data from the NYS Department of Health:

 

  • While non-Hispanic White women have the highest likelihood of getting breast cancer, non-Hispanic Black women are the most likely to die from breast cancer in NYS.[1]
  • Non-Hispanic Black males have the highest rates of getting prostate cancer and dying from prostate cancer than any other racial/ethnic group in NYS.[2]

 

In the U.S., breast cancer is the 2nd leading cause of cancer deaths among women, with non-Hispanic Black women having the highest death rate among all racial/ethnic groups.[3] Factors contributing to this includes Black women being diagnosed with breast cancer at advance stages of the disease and Black women experiencing delays in getting treatment.[4] Similarly, prostate cancer is the 2nd leading cause of cancer deaths among men,[5] with non-Hispanic Black men most likely to get prostate cancer out of all racial/ethnic groups and twice as likely to die from prostate cancer compared to non-Hispanic White men.[6] Another prostate illness, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), which is the enlargement of the prostate, has been shown in some studies to be more common in non-Hispanic Black men and Hispanic men compared to other racial/ethnic groups, and is often undiagnosed and untreated in people of color.[7] [8] [9]

 

Although cancer screening and other elective medical procedures were put on hold because of the COVID-19 pandemic, it is still important to get regular cancer screening, annual physical exams, and other medical exams. Remember, recovery is possible with early detection and early treatment. Do it today.



Mr. Roger Miller, Health Investigator at the Nassau County Department of Health
Dr. Mason Pimsler, Internist and Geriatric Medicine Doctor at Long Island Family Health Centers
Dr. Andrea Ault-Brutus, Director of the Office of Health Equity, Nassau County Department of Health


Dr. Carolyn McCummings - Commissioner, Nassau County Department of Human Services
Dr. Larry Norton - Senior Vice President, Office of the President; Medical Director, Evelyn H. Lauder Breast Center; Deputy Director for Clinical and Translational Science, MSK Comprehensive Cancer Center; and Norna S. Sarofim Chair of Clinical Oncology
Dr. Andrea Ault-Brutus, Director of the Office of Health Equity, Nassau County Department of Health

 

Lifestyle changes that may lower your risk for breast cancer and prostate cancer

  • Maintain a healthy weight and cut down on red meat
  • Exercise regularly
  • Limit alcohol
  • Eat nutritious foods
  • Never smoke or quit smoking

 

For More Information:

 

New York State Breast Cancer Services - provides information about breast cancer resources that are available in NYS, including where to find a screening location nearest you.

https://www.ny.gov/new-york-state-breast-cancer-programs/new-york-state-breast-cancer-services

 

The NYS Cancer Services Program offers free breast cancer screening and diagnostic services for uninsured, eligible New Yorkers. Breast cancer screening is also fully covered through New York’s Medicaid program.

https://www.health.ny.gov/diseases/cancer/services/

 

If you are in a health insurance plan that participates in the New York State of Health marketplace, these plans cover cancer screening at NO COST to the patient. 

https://nystateofhealth.ny.gov/

 

The Medicaid Cancer Treatment Program (MCTP) is a Medicaid program for eligible persons who are found to be in need of treatment for breast, cervical, colorectal or prostate cancer (and in some cases, pre-cancerous conditions of these cancers).

https://www.health.ny.gov/diseases/cancer/treatment/mctp/

 

Memorial Sloan Kettering Breast Cancer Resources

https://www.mskcc.org/cancer-care/types/breast

 

Hewlett House is a community learning resource center for cancer patients and their families located in Nassau County.

https://hewlett-house.org/

 

 

 


[1] New York Cancer Registry, Snapshot of Cancer in New York. https://www.health.ny.gov/statistics/cancer/registry/pdf/snapshot.pdf. Retrieved on October 2nd, 2020.

[2] Ibid.

[3] American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network, Disparities in Breast Cancer: African American Women. https://www.fightcancer.org/sites/default/files/FINAL%20-%20Disparities%20AABreastCancer%2002.14.17%20.pdf. Retrieved on October 27, 2020.

[4] Ibid.

[5] American Cancer Society, Key Statistics for Prostate Cancer, https://www.cancer.org/cancer/prostate-cancer/about/key-statistics.html. Retrieved on September 21, 2020.

[6] Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Who is at Risk for Prostate Cancer? https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/prostate/basic_info/risk_factors.htm. Retrieved on September 21, 2020.

[7] Gill, H. (2015). Racial disparities in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Med Surg Urol, 4, 157.

[8] Hoke, G. P., & McWilliams, G. W. (2008). Epidemiology of benign prostatic hyperplasia and comorbidities in racial and ethnic minority populations. The American journal of medicine, 121(8), S3-S10.

[9] Patel, P. M., Sweigert, S. E., Nelson, M., Gupta, G., Baker, M., Weaver, F. M., & McVary, K. T. (2020). Disparities in Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia Progression: Predictors of Presentation to the Emergency Department in Urinary Retention. The Journal of Urology, 10-1097.