Social Services News Releases

Posted on: August 18, 2017

Mangano Emphasizes the Importance of Safe Sleep for Infants

Mineola, NY – Nassau County Executive Edward P. Mangano today announced that ensuring safe sleep for infants and toddlers is paramount in preventing deaths related to smothering. Recently in New York City, 3 more babies died within one week from suffocation as a result of sleeping in bed with family members.

“These infant deaths are preventable,” stated County Executive Mangano. “It is critical we continue to support the State’s message that babies sleep safest alone, on their backs and in a safety approved crib without any soft items. This message needs to continuously and clearly be communicated to parents and caregivers of small children.”

Information obtained on the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website shows that in 2015, 25% of the unexpected infant deaths were caused by “accidental suffocation and strangulation in bed.” (https://www.cdc.gov/sids/data.htm). New York State, where more than 50% of infant mortalities are attributed to accidental roll-over suffocation, has been promoting safe sleep for several years, distributing posters and flyers in English and Spanish to be hung in local businesses and health centers across the state.

“Roll-over suffocations of infants are tragedies that are entirely preventable,” added DSS Commissioner Dr. John Imhof. “We understand how many parents enjoy having their infants sleep with them, but this comes with the danger of possible suffocation when everyone falls asleep.”

New York State offers useful information to parents and caregivers on-line.

For more information on safe sleep, please visit the New York State website: http://ocfs.ny.gov/main/prevention/infant_sleeping.asp and http://ocfs.ny.gov/main/cps/tips.asp.

There is also an on-line Parent Guide entitled “Starting Life Together” which can be accessed at http://www.nysparentguide.org/ . The material provides caregivers with information intended to build strong & healthy parent/child relationships.

Additionally, there is a confidential Parent Helpline at 1-800-CHILDREN (1-800-244-5373) available daily from 9 a.m. – 10 p.m.

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