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Legislative District 18

Posted on: July 22, 2020

Legislator Lafazan Discusses Bill to Re-Name County Building in Honor of Trailblazing NY Congresswom

(MINEOLA, N.Y.) - Nassau County Legislator Joshua Lafazan (Woodbury) has introduced a resolution to rename the Nassau County office building located at 240 Old Country Road in Mineola in honor of trailblazing New York Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm. Legislator Lafazan filed the resolution on Monday, July 20, 2020 with the backing of his seven Minority Caucus colleagues as co-sponsors.

The municipal building at 240 Old Country Road currently serves as the base of operation for the Office of the Nassau County Clerk, Comptroller, Consumer Affairs, and Board of Elections.

“During her life, Shirley Chisholm broke barriers and shattered glass ceilings on numerous occasions as she fought for the rights of children, economically disadvantaged people, women, and people of color,” Legislator Lafazan said. “It is beyond fitting for such a prominent location in Nassau County to bear the name of a fearless, trailblazing public servant who never lost focus on her mission to ensure that the American dream was within reach of every American.”

WHEN: Legislator Lafazan is available for on-camera (in-person and Zoom) and phone interviews after 10 a.m. on Wednesday, July 22. Please contact Communications Director Danny Schrafel or Press Secretary Holly Curtis to schedule an interview.

WHAT: Under the resolution, 240 Old Country Road will be re-named the Shirley Chisholm Building. In addition, a plaque commemorating Congresswoman Chisholm’s contributions to society would be installed and contain the following biographical information:

“As the daughter of immigrants from the Caribbean, Shirley Chisholm embraced and embodied the American ideals of tenaciously pursuing opportunity while improving society. During her laudable career as an educator, author, social activist, and public servant she was a tireless advocate for the rights of children, economically disadvantaged people, women, and people of color. She served in the New York State Assembly from 1965 to 1968 and was rapidly propelled as a national figure and pioneering role model when she became the first African American woman elected to the U.S. Congress in 1968 and the first African American to seek the nomination for president in 1972. Her legacy of uplifting others and transcending barriers embodies the best of the human spirit and the hopes of a more perfect union where every American can pursue their dreams.”

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